SPIKE™ Prime with Python

Counting Your Steps

Investigate using variables and data while counting their steps

45 minutos
Principiante
6.º de primaria a 2.º de secundaria

Questions to investigate

• How can you add mathematical calculations within a program?

Prepare

• Ensure SPIKE Prime hubs are charged, especially if connecting through Bluetooth.

Engage

(Group Activity, 5 minutes)

Engage students in a conversation about walking and counting their steps. How many students have a device that can do that? How many students use the apps available to them?

Have small groups of students stand shoulder to shoulder and take 5-10 steps forward. Why do they end up at different locations? How would the applications deal with that? Is a step the same for everyone?

Explore

(Small Groups, 20 minutes)

Students will investigate using a smart device to track their steps as they use walking as a mode of transportation.

Direct students to the BUILD section in the SPIKE App. Here students can access the building instructions for the Pedometer model. Students will only need to build the Pedometer and not the stand.  Ask students to build the model. The building instructions are also available at https://education.lego.com/en-us/support/spike-prime/building-instructions.   

Direct students to open a new project in the Python programming canvas. Ask students to erase any code that is already in the programming area. Students should connect their hub.  

Prompt students to think about how to determine how many steps they have taken. Ask students to brainstorm which sensor(s) could be used to determine the number of steps taken. Guide students to the motion sensor. Specifically, have the students think about the roll, pitch, and yaw of the hub.

Discuss the ways the model can move when attached to your body. The pitch of the hub is the hub’s front side tilted forward or backward. (Like tips of the fingers of your outstretched hand tilting up or down.) The roll of the hub is hub’s front side moving down to the right or down to the left. (Like your outstretched hand rolling so the little finger rolls down or up.) The yaw of the hub is the top of the hub moving to the right or left at an angle. (Like turning your outstretched hand so the fingers start pointing forward but move to point to the right or left.)

Students need to create a program that will measure their steps.

Sample Program:

from spike import PrimeHub, LightMatrix, Button, MotionSensor
hub = PrimeHub() 

\#set up our step variable
step = 0
while True:
\#retrieve the yaw angle
yawAmount=hub.motion_sensor.get_yaw_angle()
if yawAmount >75:
step = step + 1
elif yawAmount < -75:
step = step + 1
\#press the left button to view how many steps you have walked
elif hub.left_button.is_pressed():
hub.light_matrix.write(step)

Allow students time to explore the program and try different values.
Introduce some new math functions to students that can be used when creating and comparing their data.

Unit_9_Lesson_3_Table.jpg

Discuss how these new functions were used in the program to get your steps.

Refining your Program
When getting the yaw angle, the pedometer collected data multiple times per second. The program doesn’t know that the angle is part of your stride. To help, we can add a variable used for the purpose of identifying when the stride so the yaw angle is only collected once which will add only one step for the students.

Sample Program:

from spike import PrimeHub, LightMatrix, Button, MotionSensor
hub = PrimeHub() 

\#set up our step variable
step = 0

\#this variable is to make sure it only counts a step the first time the yaw is > 100
\#the yaw angle is dependent on your Spike Prime. Each hub will act a little differently.
true_step = 0
while True:
\#retrieve the yaw angle
yawAmount=hub.motion_sensor.get_yaw_angle()
if yawAmount >75 and true_step==0:
step = step + 1
true_step = 1
elif yawAmount < -75 and true_step == 1:
step = step + 1
true_step = 0
\#press the left button to view how many steps you have walked
elif hub.left_button.is_pressed():
hub.light_matrix.write(step)

Allow students time to explore the program.

Explain

(Whole Group, 5 minutes)

Discuss with students how the program worked.
Ask students questions like:
• What was used to count the steps?
• How accurate is your pedometer? Explain.
• Why do you think the pedometer counted too many steps?

Elaborate

(Small Groups, 10 minutes)

Challenge students to add to the program mathematical computations that will calculate the speed. Remember that speed is measured in distance over time.

While testing a program it is good practice to print information into the console to verify the data is accurate and to make sure the program is running as planned.

Sample Program:

from spike import PrimeHub, LightMatrix, Button, MotionSensor
from spike.control import Timer

hub = PrimeHub()
\#set up our variables, enter your stride length in feet
step = 0
stride = 3
time_walked = 0
distance_walked = 0
speed = 0
true_step = 0
timer=Timer()
timer.reset()
while True:
yawAmount=hub.motion_sensor.get_yaw_angle()
if yawAmount >75 and true_step==0:
step = step + 1
true_step = 1
elif yawAmount < -75 and true_step == 1:
step = step + 1
true_step = 0
elif hub.left_button.is_pressed():
time_walked = timer.now()
distance_walked = step * stride
speed = distance_walked/time_walked
hub.light_matrix.write(speed)
print(step)
print(stride)
print(time_walked)
print(distance_walked)
print(speed)

Evaluate

(Group Exercise, 5 minutes)

Teacher Observation:
Discuss the program with students.
Ask students questions like:
• What happened when you added the true_step variable?
• How does the true_step variable keep the motion sensor from collecting a reading?
• What did you learn about programming calculations?
• What iterations can you make to improve your pedometer?

Self-Assessment:
Have students answer the following in their journals:
• What did you learn today about using calculations in your program?
• What characteristics of a good teammate did I display today?
• Ask students to rate themselves on a scale of 1-3, on their time management today.
• Ask student to rate themselves on a scale of 1-3, on their materials (parts) management today.

Soporte para el profesor

Students will:
• Integrate mathematical calculations into their programs using variables
• Create a program that will measure footsteps

• SPIKE Prime sets ready for student use
• Devices with the SPIKE App installed
• Student journals

CSTA
2-CS-02 Design projects that combine hardware and software components to collect and exchange data.
2-AP-10 Use flowcharts and/or pseudocode to address complex problems as algorithms
2-AP-13 Decompose problems and subproblems into parts to facilitate the design, implementation, and review of programs.
2-AP-16 Incorporate existing code, media, and libraries into original programs, and give attribution.
2-AP-17 Systematically test and refine programs using a range of test cases.
2-AP-19 Document programs in order to make them easier to follow, test, and debug.

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